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Opens August 4, The Senedd - National Assembly for Wales, Cardiff Bay
in collaboration with Wales for Peace (Cymru dros Heddwch)

Ifanwy Williams, aged 95, stands against the dramatic scenery of the Snowdonia National Park. For seventy years Ifanwy has been part of the peace movement in Wales. For ten years she has chaired the Glaslyn and Dwyryd Branch of Cymdeithas y Cymod (Fellowship of Reconciliation in Wales). It was Ifanwy who coined the phrase Adar Angau (death birds/death drones) when the Fellowship began a campaign to raise awareness of plans to test and develop unmanned drone aircraft at the Llanbedr airfield in Snowdonia. ‘’I aim to be a Christian. I am a pacifist. I don’t believe in killing. There are other ways of meeting difficult situations.’’
© Lee Karen Stow

Sponsored by Ann Jones, Deputy Presiding Officer of the National Assembly for Wales, this exhibition explores the impact of war on the lives of women, and tells the story of women who have strived for peace. It includes photography from the Poppies: Women, War, Peace exhibition, as well as a look at the story of women from Wales’ past who responded to the horror of the First World War and beyond. The exhibition will also showcase Wales' schools and community work.



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Women's peace event in Beit-Jala on the outskirts of Bethlehem, co-ordinated by the Women’s Group of the Parents Circle Families Forum. The Forum brings together families of those killed in the ongoing conflict who believe that by speaking openly of their loss, reconciliation and a permanent peace is possible in order to end to the bloodshed. More than 200 bereaved Palestinian and Israeli women turned up to spray freedom and peace slogans on a mock wall symbolising the Israeli West Bank separation barrier. Armed with wooden hammers, they beat the wall down into pieces. Finally, they marched as one, in silent protest along a slice of the real separation barrier, holding aloft banners demanding an end to the Israeli Occupation.




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Mom Meth, survivor of the Khmer Rouge genocide (April 1975 to January 1979), Phnom Penh, Cambodia © Lee Karen Stow


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